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Category Archives: Complications

5 Facts About Boob Jobs Debunked

(Partner Post, by Claire McPhillimy)

Whether we’re wearing the wrong size bra or showing too much cleavage, when it comes to boobs we’re regularly getting it all wrong – or so we’re told.

But misunderstandings and mistakes aren’t our fault, not when you consider that from the moment puberty hits the only information we get about our breasts is usually gleaned from playground whispers. After all, the relationship we have with our barely developed boobs is kicked off listening to classroom debates about who is or isn’t stuffing their bra and fearful gossip about the dangers of wearing one to bed! Often, we end up carrying these childhood insecurities and mistaken ideas all the way to adulthood.

The Mystery of Boob Jobs

Nowhere is this clearer than the world of boob jobs.

Although 9,652 breast augmentations were performed in the UK last year, for many women going under the knife to boost their bust remains a dream.

One of the biggest reasons is that, like those playground rumors, we’re inundated with false stories and misinformation about what the process entails.

When you’ve been toying with the idea of getting a boob job for a while, separating fact from fiction with the information available is tricky.

And it’s left many of us with unfounded anxieties.

Separating fact from fiction

Don’t get us wrong, you’re right (and sensible!) to ask questions before a surgery.

But lots of your concerns are probably based on “facts” which may be fabrications or fear-mongering exaggerations.

To help you make an informed decision, we’ve debunked five of most common myths about boob jobs.

#1: You Can’t Breastfeed Afterward

Women often believe that breastfeeding won’t be possible after a boob job, and delay having one until they’ve finished having kids.

While some surgeries are riskier, like reductions, most women who have implants go on to successfully breastfeed. A respectable surgeon will be willing to talk through all possibilities with you, so don’t be shy about raising any concerns.

#2: The Gym Will Be Off-Limits

Although gym bunnies and sports enthusiasts often worry that implants will ruin their fitness regime, it’s only the recovery process which is majorly effected. You’ll be advised not to exercise at all for the first couple of weeks, and keep it low impact for at least the next couple of weeks.

Yes, it’s a pretty significant break if you’re used to hitting the treadmill five days a week, but after you’re healed up you’ll be able to resume your normal workouts.

#3: Say Goodbye to Underwired Bras

The joy of filling out a new cup size and exploring different lingerie is a big motivation for getting a boob job until someone drops the bombshell that you won’t be able to wear underwired bras afterward.

But it’s only immediately following surgery that you’ll be advised to stick to a non-wired, comfortable bra. Once you’re given the all clear from your surgeon, you’ll be able to wear whatever types of bra you choose.

#4: Everyone Will Know

Post-surgery, some people love their new boobs so much they want to show the results to the world. For others, a natural boost they can keep entirely to themselves is the goal.

The good news is that a subtle look is achievable. A good surgeon will advise you on the correct size, the appropriate placing (above or below the muscles) and the best shape of implant to give you your ideal look.

#5: Visible Scarring Will Be Left Behind

As with all medicine, cosmetic surgery has come a long way. New methods of performing breast enlargements are increasingly effective and scarring isn’t as big an issue as you imagine.

An expert surgeon will assess your individual case first but should be able to hide scars around the areola or in the small crease under your breast. Although you’ll know it’s there, strangers on the street will be none the wiser 🙂

Why You Shouldn’t Be Afraid Of A Breast Augmentation

Usually, the one thing holding women back from getting the breast augmentation they’ve always wanted is FEAR.

It’s exceedingly common to be afraid of many things, some of which are:

-the surgery/anesthesia
-pain and recovery
-potential complications
-getting a bad boob job
-needing more surgery down the road

But there’s good news. One factor – the plastic surgeon you choose – can basically wipe that whole slate of fears clean if you make an excellent choice.

That means finding a surgeon who is board-certified, has numerous before and after photos showing his/her beautiful aesthetic skills and abilities, takes the time to give you personal attention and care, listens to what you have to say, as well as your fears and concerns, and operates a first-rate and spotlessly clean facility with a board-certified anesthesiologist and friendly staff.

In fact, if you hire a good surgeon, a breast augmentation is one of the most routine and safest cosmetic surgeries you can have.

The crucial sticking point? You’ve got to do your homework, and pick the right plastic surgeon.

Woman Sues Plastic Surgeon For Giving Her "Four Breasts"

In a dramatic five million dollar lawsuit filed by Maria Alaimo of Staten Island, the 47 year-old patient accuses her plastic surgeon  (Dr. Keith Berman) of implanting her with “four breasts.”

YES, FOUR BREASTS.

But put the brakes on that freaky visual that just popped into your head!

What Maria is actually referring to is a breast augmentation complication called “double bubble.”

Double bubble happens when an implant falls down BEHIND the fold of the breast instead of forward INTO the breast. As a result, the breast ends up with two folds that make it look like one breast is stacked on top of the other.

You might need to read that again to really “get” what I mean about how it’s caused.

Here’s a photo set to illustrate what I mean. Note that this IS NOT Maria Alaimo – it’s a patient of Mountlake Terrace, Washington Plastic Surgeon Dr. Richard A. Baxter. The top set shows the double bubble, and the bottom set shows Dr. Baxter’s amazing post-corrective surgery:

Now back to the lawsuit.
Maria had the first failed boob job in 2003, and she claims that two corrective attempts by Dr. Berman left her no better off – with breasts that “appear flattened on the bottom with severe swells the size of a softball on top,” causing her to suffer from “pain, disability, loss of self-esteem, humiliation and embarrassment,” – as reported by consumerist.com.
But that isn’t all.
Maria is also blaming her divorce on the failed surgeries, saying that she could no longer be intimate with her husband after her disfiguring surgery.
Interestingly enough, the lawsuit states that she paid $2,999 for the breast augmentation in 2003, plus a $500 referral fee. That’s such an eyebrow-lifting bargain basement price, that I would have immediately questioned why the steep discount; breast augmentations in the New York area average about $7,000-$9,000.
But a search on the American Board of Plastic Surgeons website shows that Dr. Spencer was board-certified for the first time in 1999 (4 years before Maria’s surgery), and was just re-tested and passed board certification again in December of this past 2009.
So is this a case of a hysterical patient who may not be revealing the whole story behind her complications? Or is it a case of poor plastic surgeon skills?
It’s impossible to tell with only the little sensational nuggets the public has of the story. It doesn’t seem right that three surgeries later, Maria’s breasts are still not fixed – but it’s also pretty ridiculous that this woman seriously thinks a breast augmentation is the sole reason her marriage ended. (That’s what she states in court documents.)
But I can’t leave you without a moral to this tale of woe!
If you have very saggy breasts, your risk of double bubble is higher.

Be sure to ask your plastic surgeon if double bubble is something you should be concerned about. Most often, a lift to remove the excess saggy skin when you get your breast augmentation can all but eliminate the risk of this complication, if you’ve hired a skilled and properly credentialed surgeon.